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Audition Information

Lost in Yonkers

by Neil Simon

Audition Dates:  

Monday, December 11 and Tuesday, December 12 from 7:00-9:00 pm.

 

Auditions will be held at the Basile Westfield Playhouse 220 N. Union Street, Westfield, IN 46074.  Please enter through the right-side doors at the front of the building.  Auditions will be held in the theater.

How to Prepare:

Those auditioning should be familiar with the script.  For a digital copy of the script, please email producer Ka’Lena Cuevas at kalenacuevas@gmail.com.  Bring a theatre resume and headshot if you have them.  Actors will perform cold reads from the script.  Bring a list of all conflicts between December 14 and February 7.  Any absences during rehearsals will affect casting.

 

Rehearsals:

Read-through: Thursday, December 14, 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Rehearsals will begin Tuesday, December 26 from 7:00 - 9:30 pm and will run Mondays – Thursdays from 7:00 - 9:30 pm. 

Performance Dates: 

February 8 - 18, 2024

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 pm. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 pm.

Synopsis: 

Set in Yonkers, New York in 1942, this memory play is about Bella, who is thirty-five years old, mentally challenged, and living at home with her mother, stern Grandma Kurnitz. As the play opens, ne'er-do-well son Eddie deposits his two young sons on the old lady's doorstep. He is financially strapped and taking to the road as a salesman. The boys are left to contend with Grandma, with Bella and her secret romance, and with Louie, her brother, a small-time hoodlum in a strange new world called Yonkers. Winner of the 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, Neil Simon’s inimitable play LOST IN YONKERS is about the trials and tribulations that test family ties.

Roles to be cast: 

JAY KURNITZ (stage age 16 or 17) – Independent, jokester type who sometimes gets carried away with situations going on around him; the play tells his coming-of-age story.

ARTY KURNITZ (stage age 13) – Jay’s younger brother. More of an observer than the rest of his family, he often goes with the flow of things, but also can be a little childish.

EDDIE KURNITZ (stage age 40’s) – Jay’s middle-aged father. After the death of his wife, he is forced to send his two sons to live with their grandmother, while he repays his large financial debts. Much like his sisters, he is shown to be a nervous wreck around Grandma.

BELLA KURNITZ (stage age early 30’s) – Jay’s aunt. She is sometimes a bit off-center and is mentally challenged, but she is also loving and protective of her nephews. Much of the second half of the play focuses on her attempts at independence from her stern mother.

GRANDMA KURNITZ (stage age 60’s - 70’s) – Eddie and Bella’s mother, a big woman, buxom, with a strong body. Jay’s grandmother. An old and stern woman. Owing to her harsh childhood, she has always been very intolerant of what in others she calls “weaknesses”. She is blunt, sometimes even in a funny way, and always knows what is going on with the people around her.

LOUIE KURNITZ (stage age late 30’s) – Jay’s flamboyant, jovial uncle who comes to live with the family when he is hiding from the local mob. He is considered by Grandma Kurnitz to be the “survivor” of the family. He has a strong, unpredictable nature, and a certain underlying dark side, which the kids uncover in the second act of the play. He works as a “bagman” for the mob.

AUNT GERT (stage age mid to late 30’s) – Jay’s aunt, and Grandma’s daughter. She is a very interesting addition to the family. Her most noticeable issue is that when she breathes, she has a tendency to suck in while still speaking, as a result of trauma instilled in her by Grandma from a young age.

That Championship Season

by Jason Miller

Audition Dates:  

Sunday, December 17 and Monday, December 18 from 7:00-9:00 pm.

 

Auditions will be held at the Basile Westfield Playhouse 220 N. Union Street, Westfield, IN 46074.  Please enter through the right-side doors at the front of the building.  Auditions will be held in the theater.

How to Prepare:

Those auditioning should be familiar with the script.  For a digital copy of the script, please email director Lori Raffel at linesbylori1@aol.com.  Bring a theatre resume and headshot if you have them.  Actors will perform cold reads from the script.  Bring a list of all conflicts between mid February and April 14, 2024.

 

Rehearsals:

Rehearsals will begin mid to late February and will run Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from  6:30 - 9:00 pm

Performance Dates: 

April 4 – 14, 2024

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 pm. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 pm.

Synopsis: 

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Tony Award, and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award as best play of the season, this brilliant, powerful play brings pathos, humor and deep compassion to its penetrating study of five men – a high-school basketball coach, now retired, and four members of the team that he guided to the state championship twenty years earlier – who meet for a reunion.

Roles to be cast: 

5 male roles

 

Coach

That Championship Season’s moral center, Coach, is an older man who coached the other four characters to a high school state basketball championship twenty years earlier. He considers that championship the crowning achievement of his career, if not his life. The victory made him and the other characters local legends. He still receives special treatment in the town because of this long ago victory.

In many ways, Coach lives in the past. He proudly proclaims that he has not changed in sixty years. His living room is nearly a museum to past decades, and he dresses in a suit with a 1940s cut. Coach’s values are also out of the 1950s. He is anti-Semitic and pro-Joseph McCarthy and Father Coughlin, a controversial conservative Catholic radio preacher. Victory is to be had at any cost for Coach.

Coach dislikes dissension, especially among his boys. He wants them to succeed in life as they did in the game, and he uses their loyalty to him to influence their decisions.

 

James Daley

James is one of the players on the 1952 championship team, and the elder brother of Tom Daley. He is married to Helen and has five children. James has remained in his hometown and is currently the principal of the local junior high school. He was also George’s campaign manager in the last election, and, at the beginning of the play, holds the position in this election as well. He hopes to run for school superintendent the following year, but when Phil hints that he might not back George for mayor, James offers himself up as an alternative. Phil does not take him up on the offer.

James is resentful of his life and feels betrayed by it. He took care of his alcoholic, dying father and contributes to the support of his alcoholic brother, Tom. James deals with unmanageable students every day of his life. Now he wants his share of the spoils and believes George is the way to get it. By the end of the play, Phil forces George to fire James as campaign manager in favor of outside professionals. Though the group makes up, and James remains on George’s staff, James’s needs are again regarded as lesser than the whole group’s.

 

Tom Daley

Tom is one of the players on the 1952 championship team, and the younger brother of James Daley. Tom is an alcoholic and drinks heavily throughout the play. He has not attended the past three reunions, and he plans to leave town soon after this one. He is unemployed and has lived in and been kicked out of many places. Tom spends much of the play pointing out the absurdities of the other character’s positions on both life and the issues at hand. He irritates everyone, especially Coach, at some point. James is especially resentful of Tom’s life because James is forced to help support him. Tom believes James only acts out of obedience, not love. Tom tells them all why Martin, the fifth player on the team, is not present, though they do not want to believe him. Coach tries to bully Tom into improving his life, but he will not submit. At the end of the play, Tom remains part of the group but still dissenting. Only he can see that they are living in a mythical world.

 

Phil Romano

Phil is one of the players on the 1952 championship team. He has remained in his hometown, running the successful business he inherited from his father. Phil is very rich and very bored. He finds pleasure in owning material possessions and in sexual relationships. Though he is married to Claire and has two children, Phil and his wife agree to have other relationships, and they both have had numerous affairs. Phil had a liaison with George’s wife, Marion, which becomes a point of contention in the play.

With his money, Phil essentially bought George the mayorship in the last election. Phil received a favorable lease on local land in return for his support. Phil has his doubts about George’s ability to win this election, and he does not want to put his money behind him again. After deciding to support George’s opponent, Norman Sharmen, then being rebuffed by him, Phil decides to fund George’s reelection only if he can bring in professional people from outside their group. Phil agrees to support George with Coach’s influence. Phil is a team player, but one with more influence than the others in the group.

 

George Sikowski

George is one of the players on the 1952 championship team. He has remained in his hometown and is currently serving as mayor. George ran for this position because Coach convinced him to. Though in his mind, he has been an ideal mayor, the other characters have pointed out his many shortcomings as a public official.

In many ways, George is the focal point of the reunion. He is running for reelection and is counting on Phil’s financial support to help him win again. But George feels betrayed by those around him. His wife recently had an affair with Phil, which wounded him deeply. George accepts her explanation that she did it for his campaign, though this is not exactly true. He is also still upset that he and his wife had a child with Down’s syndrome, whom they institutionalized under advisement from Coach.

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